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Friday, June 10, 2005

Actually Beginning to "Build" the boat

While most activities so far have been more "cleanup" oriented, we just started the first "build task"...

Installing the bobstay fitting.

The bobstay is the cable or rod that connects to a fitting at the waterline at the bow up to the underside of the bow to counter the tension of the forestay (installed later).

The bobstay fitting is this fitting at waterline at the bow. It is installed by cutting a six inch slot along the "spine". The fitting is installed from the inside.

So far, we have just cut the slot and "dry fitted" the piece.

This weekend we hope to permanently bed it with adhesive and skin it with mat/roving on the inside (using infusion). I hope to have pictures.

9 comments:

Anonymous said...

Funny, you're putting one in and I'm removing mine. Have it out now and am putting on an external fitting. Had a 32 before and picked up blisters begining at the bobstay fitting. Hope you mounted yours 6" or so above the water line.

robert said...

It is not exactly six inches above the waterline. Maybe more like three or four. I will am thinking about installing it differently than originally spec'd. Specifically, I will vacuum bag a layer of fiberglass around 'wings' of the stainless fitting itself. Use methacrylate adhesive to bond the fitting to the hull. Then staggered layers of mat/roving on the inside against the hull. Top it off with 5200 on the outside. Also, leave a lead to bond the bobstay fitting with the rest of the bonding system.

Also, the fitting is 318 SS instead of 304 SS as the original factory used. Should be a bit more resistive to corrosion.

Anonymous said...

It wasn't the corrosion I had a problem with. It was water intrusion into the area between the fitting and the hull. Any water in that area can seep into the hull laminates.

robert said...

Vacuum infusion should ensure there are is no air pockets for water to intrude. Even on the laminate cross section. If the factory simply skinned the back of the fitting, then squirted sealant in from the front (as is described in the construction manual) then I can see water can get in there eventually, I will be using thickened resin to make sure all gaps are filled.

Anonymous said...

provided it has the same coeffecient of expansion that the hull has and no undo stress on the fitting then all theoretically would be ok. Because of the stress and different coefficient expansion of the the parts I would still worry. But alas, that's what makes us all sailors, the differences. :) Good luck.

robert said...

Vynlester resins have more "give" when under stress than polyesters. Certainly more than epoxy.

robert said...

Coefficients of expansion??? I would realy be surprised if the hull expanded significantly over this 1/2 inch opening where there is at least 1 inch of laminates.

Anonymous said...

You don' t need much difference. Just enough difference that the bond is broken.

robert said...

send me those coefficients when you got em.