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Saturday, June 02, 2012

Electrical System Components

Equipment mounts are being designed and cut. Components are being test fitted. Lots of wiring, terminal crimping and ziptie-ing to do before we even think of applying "power".

Component Mounts being cut on the CNC machine.
 Among the first components to be fitted are the 24volt-30amp battery charger and the 24V/12V DC-DC converter.
Test fit of first components.

4 comments:

Anonymous said...

Interesting little tid bit I picked up regarding LED's. A few guys at my marina installed them but complained they burn out. An article in last months Cruising world mag pointed out that if your at the dock or the Genny is running and your smart charger is bulk charging, your electrical system is almost 15 volts as a result! Turn on a light...problem. With your 24 volt system, is this possible. If the highest charge rate is ??? 29 volts (guessing) will the device responsible for splitting it put out 12V or 14 1/2V. This was something I never thought of.

Robert Sutton said...

Good points. Most LED light systems, in and of themselves, are not powered by 12volts directly (usually), native voltages are something like 5V. So I suspect most LED lights, especially ones designed to replace incandescent or halogens, have integral voltage regulators (as a chip). In which case, the quality of the regulator makes for overall quality of the LED. If the regulator cant handle voltage variance, its gonna toast the LED. So for a 12V or 24V LED, the quality of the regulator will be key.

But I am by no means an expert on LEDs.

Related: the 24V Mastervolt switching system can "fake" 12V for lights using PWM (pulse width modulation). But it only works for halogens and incandescents.

Anonymous said...

I picked up a cheap plug in LED yesterday to test it out. I ran my inverter to the little microwave using the house battery for 8 minutes. Then turned the charger on. The voltage checked at 14.7 @ the socket I put the LED light in the socket and it glowed brightly and burnt out two minutes later.Colin

Robert Sutton said...

I spoke with the Dr. LED rep a couple months a go and got a good look at their products (including the circuit boards). Though not cheap, they seem very well engineered. Critical components concerning voltage and RFI are US made.