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Sunday, December 06, 2015

Re-gaining Momentum on the Interior

With continuing tweaks and adjustments happening with the new shop, the setup is now ready for pushing forward with the "wood" related aspects of finishing the boat interior.

Before the new shop, we were in need of a wood species. Of the few samples under consideration, the choice has been narrowed to sapele or khaya. Both are an african mahogany, available as a plywood, at a relatively affordable cost. Sepele, while similar to teak in color and darkness, might make the cabin interior too dark for the admiral's taste. Khaya, though lighter is, can be a bit reddish/orange depending on what oil/varnish is used for finish. So, with that, comes a few more experiments...

The experiments are focused on the upper cabinet faces in the forward salon. Not just for selecting the wood species, but also what hardware and construction techniques can be used. Whatever design/construction we decide, it must also work throughout the rest of the boat, with little variation.


This is a fully functioning cabinet door mock-up, made from a scrap piece of plywood for testing cabinet hardware and construction. There are a pair of fully concealed inset hinges behind. Turns out the rounded corners, with these hinges, prevent the door from fully opening, not even to 90 degrees. The corners will have to be square if we use these hinges. The latch is a push button locking latch. The reveal gap is 3/16 of an inch, which still seems a bit wide. Will try 1/8 inch next time.


This freshly milled hardwood sample is khaya african mahogany. Strips have been ripped to see how this wood inlays and behaves in the router.

More experiments to come...

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